Portfolio

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DeSoto – September 2020

Owner had taken down a few pieces here and there and like many decided that was enough. We came in and pulled all the paper except one room which was pretty much glued right into drywall so we skimmed back out the test area, sanded down the seams and skimmed those, sealed the paper and repainted. All the rest of the rooms came down (some very stubborn), did some patching, sanded down all the walls, sealed and repainted.

This home is a good example of the challenges of all wallpaper jobs – even within the same home paper removal can go drastically different from one room to the next. On this property we ran into normal two piece brown backed paper which came down pretty normal, two rooms where it was a little difficult and two rooms where we basically had to power sand through the top layer to get a clean release – and that final room that was right onto drywall with no chance of removal without significant damage. And even after the paper is down you may find unexpected things – in the upper hallway wallpaper was run directly over an open air return, two small holes in the wall in the bedrooms and even old anchor holes all of which have to be repaired.

Before:

After:

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Pacific – August 2020

Wallpaper… wallpaper and even more wallpaper. Some of it up right, some of it not. Likely one of the more challenging removals but the biggest worry from the initial pictures was what looked like bare drywall… instead the installer used the very same acrylic type sealer we use after removal to seal out residual wallpaper glue. This was mostly an original builder install and for some  reason two different types of paper were used – the two part paper backing type which is a simple and usually damage free removal and the other a very common thin fronted and thin backed white membrane paper which in many cases can be stubborn to remove cleanly. The first bathroom shown was a paper removal only as it is going to be remodeled so there was no reason to repair the walls or paint. The job entailed the upstairs hall style bathroom (remove only), a secondary standard bedroom that had top to chair rail paper, a third bedroom with chair rail to floor paper, the two story foyer which was entirely papered as was  the areas of the first floor including secondary bathroom, rear hall/mud room, laundry, kitchen and sunroom. We did our usual process of remove, patch walls, sand, seal, first coat, check for last second patching, second coat and done.

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U-City – July 2020

Before the painting began we stripped down three rooms of wallpaper and backing. Once complete we allow the walls to dry till the next morning. At that point we patch all visible issues and allow to dry then sand the entire wall surface top to bottom and apply a sealer to lock down any residual glue. That sealer is allowed to dry for 24 hours at which time it’s ready to paint.

With the wallpaper down it’s time to paint. As the home is being prepared for sale we went with Accessible Beige throughout.

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Kirkwood – June 2020

Returned to this property from April to finish their bathroom and living room. I am still trying to find the pics of the living room however so here are the bathroom finish pics.

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St. Charles – May 2020

Took some medium level oak colored cabinets to a painted white – the first using the new enamel/urethane Emerald product on top of our normal primer.  Color used was Sherwin ‘Pure White’ with white based primer.

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Kirkwood – April 2020

First half of this project completed so owners could get moved in quickly. Three upstairs bedrooms painted, walls only and some minor patching. A bathroom and some downstairs areas will come in a few weeks. Since the rooms were drying at the time the pics were taken these will be updated when the other work happens.

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Dittmer – April 2020

We were asked by a customer if we are able to paint modular and mobile homes. The simple answer is yes! There was an added complication though – the unit had been heavily smoked in so there was a thick layer of smoker tar on all the walls and ceilings. Instead of using the standby oil based primer to seal everything we used a new product that has virtually no smell and seals equally as good as the old oil. Ceilings and walls were sealed throughout then we applied a coat of ceiling paint then painted out all the rooms and closets.

The colors used:
Green – SW6738 – Vegan
Gray – SW6254 – Lazy Gray
Purple – SW9067 – Forever Lilac
Blue – SW6793 – Bluebell
Ceilings – Brod Dugan Suburban

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